Non-Latin Script Domain Extensions Receive a Mixed Reception in Some Script Homelands

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Non-Latin Script Domain Extensions Receive a Mixed Reception in Some Script Homelands

It’s still much too early to tell if the most important move by ICANN since its inception will work to the Internet’s advantage or not.

If the opinions expressed in a recent New York Times article containing comments from the paper’s Russian language blog are any indication, the birth of a new multi-character domain-name-extension universe is not being met with universal applause, even by those who might be expected to cheer. “Cyrillicization equals isolation” complains one writer. “The idea is absurd, awkward and useless,” says another.

Remember, these are Russian speakers writing here. They feel that Cyrillic domain extensions are apt to be used against the Russian people rather than for them. Isolation is a recurring theme: “Who is more interested in that?” asks one writer, “Russia or the rest of the world?” Others fear their own government using the new domain extension to control the internet environment: “Cyrillic domains…one more step toward global censorship in the Russian Internet.”

As yet it remains to be seen if other non-Latin script domain extensions were received as negatively as the Cyrillic. And then, who knows, maybe the negativity in a New York Times sponsored blog has more to say about the bloggers than the script: elitism rearing its ugly head, perhaps?

Not all the comments on the Time’s blog were negative. Several mentioned them as a boon for the older generation allowing them easier access to the net; but for younger users it was deemed unnecessary. What interests me here is how the opinion of Russian speakers who are presumably familiar with the Cyrillic alphabet parallels that of the balance of Internet users worldwide. Some saw the coming of non-Latin characters as the greatest thing since sliced bread, others foretold anarchy or increased government control. A majority, of course, have no idea what is going on and couldn’t care less.

Non-Latin Script Domain Extensions Receive a Mixed Reception in Some Script Homelands

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#NonLatin #Script #Domain #Extensions #Receive #Mixed #Reception #Script #Homelands